How to Install WonderCMS on CentOS 7

In this tutorial, we will show you how to install WonderCMS with Nginx on a CentOS 7 VPS.

WonderCMS is a free and open-source flat file CMS. It’s built with PHP, jQuery, and HTML/CSS, and is aimed to be an extremely small, lightweight, and straightforward CMS solution.  No initial configuration is required. The installation process is quite simple and if you follow the instructions provided in this tutorial, you will have WonderCMS running on your server in less than 10 minutes.

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How to Install Wekan on CentOS 7

In this tutorial, we will be installing Wekan and Snap on a CentOS 7 VPS.

Wekan is a web-based kanban board application that provides task distribution using intuitive graphics for better and modern team collaboration. Wekan makes use of what they call ‘Board’ from which you can add your team members. Added members can be assigned on a ‘Card’ which is simply a card-like interface that contains the details about a task.

This basic concept of ‘Board’ and ‘Cards’ make the arrangement of tasks effortless to perform since team members can see what the overall progress of the team is with regards of work to be done, work that’s currently being done, and any work that’s already done which in return increases the productivity of the team.

Wekan almost provides the same features of Trello, with some advantages:

  • Source code is fully open-source
  • Source code is reviewed by security researchers
  • Powered by mainstream web technologies e.g. Nginx, Node JS, and MongoDB
  • No monthly subscription payment fees
  • Can be hosted on your own server
  • Can be used in a private or local network
  • Continues releases and bug fixes from maintainers

For installation, Wekan uses Snap, which is simply a packaging software for cross-platform and dependency-free installation.

Wekan is administered under the MIT License and is currently supported by Wekan Team under its maintainer under the name of  ‘xet7’.

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How to Install WordPress with OpenLiteSpeed on Ubuntu 18.04

In this tutorial, we will show you how to install and configure WordPress with OpenLiteSpeed on an Ubuntu 18.04 VPS.

OpenLiteSpeed is a lightweight, open-source HTTP server developed and copyrighted by LiteSpeed Technologies, Inc. It provides a user-friendly web interface and supports various operating systems, including Linux, Mac OS, SunOS, and FreeBSD. WordPress is the most popular content management system, or CMS, available on the internet. With a massive community, great documentation, countless themes, and a large choice of plugins, you can make a website about almost anything using WordPress. Let’s begin with the installation.

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How to Easily Remove Packages Installed From Source in Linux

How to Easily Remove Packages Installed From Source in Linux
How to Easily Remove Packages Installed From Source in Linux

In one of our previous articles, we’d shown you how to install and uninstall software in Linux outside the regular package managers. In that, we also saw that well-constructed software comes with built-in uninstallers. This way, you can remove the packages as easily as you install them.

Unfortunately, this isn’t always the case. There are plenty of packages out in the wild which don’t allow for clean removal. Sometimes you have no choice but to use a package like this because you need the functionality. However, there is a solution to the problem. In this article, we’ll show you how to use the software called “stow” to easily remove packages installed from in Linux.

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How to Install Apache on CentOS (with Screenshots)

How to Install Apache on CentOS
How to Install Apache on CentOS

If you’ve just got a shiny new VPS or dedicated server to play with, chances are that you want to use it as a web server – and that means Apache. Each Linux flavor has a slightly different Apache configuration and usage, so it’s important to know which one you want to use. In this tutorial, We’ll show you how to install Apache on CentOS and access basic files on it.

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How to Multi-Task in Linux with the Command Line

How to Multi-Task in Linux with the Command Line
How to Multi-Task in Linux with the Command Line

One of the most jarring moments when moving from a Windows-based environment to using the command line is the loss of easy multi-tasking. Even on Linux, if you use an X Window system, you can use the mouse to just click on a new program and open it. On the command line, however, you’re pretty much stuck with what’s on your screen at any given time. In this tutorial, we will show you how to multi-task in Linux with the command line.

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How to Change User Password in Linux

Linux Change User Password
Linux Change User Password

change user password LinuxWe will show you how to change user password in Linux. Changing user passwords in Linux could be one of the most common tasks you will have to perform while you are administering a multi-user server. This is a very simple task though and in this tutorial, we will show you how to change the user password on a Linux VPS regardless of which distribution you are currently using.

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How to Create Human Readable Output with Linux Commands

How to Create Human Readable Output with Linux Commands

The command line interface is a lot more “information dense” compared to the equivalent GUIs on Windows. With a single instruction, you can get a screen full of data, with columns, calculations, and colors. Most commands have additional options that allow you to modify their output so that you get the exact information you’re looking for.

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How to Deal with Huge (and Growing) Log Files in Linux

How to Deal with Huge Log Files in Linux

If you’ve managed a Linux server for any length of time, you’re familiar with the problem of log files. They can sometimes be difficult enough to even find in the first place, and then you’re sometimes confronted with a file that’s hundreds of MB in size (or even GB). Searching through it is a pain, and they can eventually even start eating up your storage space.

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