What is Linux VPS Hosting?


what is linux vps hosting

If you have a site that gets a lot of traffic, or at least, is expected to generate a lot of traffic, then you might want to consider getting a Linux VPS hosting package. A Linux VPS hosting package is also one of your best options if you want more control over the things that are installed on the server where your website is hosted at. Here are some of the frequently asked questions about Linux VPS hosting, answered.

What does Linux VPS stand for?

Basically, Linux VPS stands for a virtual private server running on a Linux system. A virtual private server is a virtual server hosted on a physical server. A server is virtual if it runs in a host computer’s memory. The host computer, in turn, can run a few other virtual servers.

So I have to share a server with other users?

In most cases, yes. However, this does not mean that you will suffer from downtime or decreased performance. Each virtual server can run its own operating system, and each of these systems can be administered independently of each other. A virtual private server has its own operating system, data, and applications that are separated from all the other systems, applications, and data on the physical host server and the other virtual servers.

Despite sharing the physical server with other virtual private servers, you can still enjoy the benefits of a more expensive dedicated server without spending a lot of money for the service.

What are the benefits of a Linux VPS hosting service?

There are many benefits when using a Linux VPS hosting service, including ease of use, increased security, and improved reliability at a lower total cost of ownership. However, for most webmasters, programmers, designers, and developers, the true benefit of a Linux VPS is the flexibility. Each virtual private server is isolated with its own operating environment, which means that you can easily and safely install the operating system that you prefer or need—in this case, Linux—as well as remove or add software and applications easily whenever you want to.

You can also modify the environment of your VPS to suit your performance needs, as well as improve the experience of your site’s users or visitors. Flexibility can be the advantage you need to set you apart from your competitors.

Note that some Linux VPS providers won’t give you full root access to your Linux VPS, in which case you’ll have limited functionality. Be sure to get a Linux VPS where you’ll have full access to the VPS, so you can modify anything you want.

Is Linux VPS hosting for everyone?

Yes! Even if you run a personal blog dedicated to your interests, you can surely benefit from a Linux VPS hosting package. If you are building and developing a website for a company, you would also enjoy the benefits. Basically, if you are expecting growth and heavy site traffic on your website, then a Linux VPS is for you.

Individuals and companies that want more flexibility in their customization and development options should definitely go for a Linux VPS, especially those who are looking to get great performance and service without paying for a dedicated server, which could eat up a huge chunk of the site’s operating costs.

I don’t know how to work with Linux, can I still use a Linux VPS?

Of course! If you get a fully managed Linux VPS, your provider will manage the server for you, and most probably, will install and configure anything you want to run on your Linux VPS. If you get a VPS from us, we’ll take care of your server 24/7 and we’ll install, configure and optimize anything for you. All these services are included for free with all our Managed Linux VPS hosting packages.

So if you use our hosting services, it means that you get to enjoy the benefits of a Linux VPS, without any knowledge of working with Linux.

Another option to easy the use of a Linux VPS for beginners is to get a VPS with cPanel, DirectAdmin or any other hosting control panel. If you use a control panel, you can manage your server via a GUI, which is a lot easier, especially for beginners. Although, managing a Linux VPS from the command line is fun and you can learn a lot by doing that.

How different is a Linux VPS from a dedicated server?

As mentioned earlier, a virtual private server is just a virtual partition on a physical host computer. The physical server is divided into several virtual servers, which could diffuse the cost and overhead expenses between the users of the virtual partitions. This is why a Linux VPS is comparatively cheaper than a dedicated server, which, as its name implies, is dedicated to only one user. For a more detailed overview of the differences, check our Physical Server (dedicated) vs Virtual Server (VPS) comparison.

Aside from being more cost-efficient than dedicated servers, Linux virtual private servers often run on host computers that are more powerful than dedicated servers—performance and capacity are often greater than dedicated servers.

I want to move from a shared hosting environment to a Linux VPS, can I do that?

If you currently use shared hosting, you can easily move to a Linux VPS. One option is to do it yourself, but the migration process can be a bit complicated and is definitely not recommended for beginners. Your best option is to find a host that offers free website migrations and let them do it for you. You can even move from shared hosting with a control panel to a Linux VPS without a control panel.

Any more questions?

Feel free to leave a comment below.

If you get a VPS from us, our expert Linux admins will help you with anything you need with your Linux VPS and will answer any questions you have about working with your Linux VPS. Our admins are available 24/7 and will take care of your request immediately.

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